Saturday, 16 July 2016

Dragonmeet Update and venues for conventions...



So the other part of the trip on Thursday and Friday was to sort out the remaining contract points for Dragonmeet with the new hotel, I should note that it's taken us a few months to get to the bottom of this, and in the end, having a face to face with them to make sure they couldn't squirm on things (or take three days to come back with another question to our question) seemed like the best idea.

All things considered, if they don't renege on anything that was said in the Friday meeting, we should be in a position to get things going (so trade halls, game bookings and all the other good stuff) by early next week, but it wouldn't be the first time that this particular hotel had delayed, so we're holding off on announcements until that is written and we've agreed it.

But it made me consider that for all those just starting out in conventions, a few things to ensure about the venue you choose...

First:  Be Pushy...

Because if they run away when you start asking for things in return, they're not looking out for your best interests to make a great event, they're looking for the greatest profit with the smallest outlay from themselves.  Find a venue that wants to work with you, not one that needs to be prodded just to wake up...

Second:  Get it in writing...

The problem with most people is that they don't like forcing others to do things, particularly if it's something where the other party has to go and amend things and change details, but the reason why you do it at this stage is so that there's no forcing at a later point, and by that, I mean them forcing you.  As you go on, you get the sense for the people at the venue you can trust, and writing may no longer be required, but in the first instance, be clear, and be covered, anything less may cause you a massive problem on the show day.

Third:  Read all the small print...

All of it, not one word missed, if they've said something in one part of the contract and their terms and conditions say something else (with the proviso at the end of the terms that standard terms overrule everything...), they can use whichever version they like best, and that'll be the version you like least...

Fourth:  Accept only what you want, not what they offer...

Most gamers won't pay £15 for a two course meal when all they were after was a pie and a can of drink for less than a fiver, and many hotels, particularly the larger ones, don't like to alter the menu they're offering.  Know your clients, know what they like to eat, get the Amuse-Bouche off the menu, hold firm to that, because most hotels are used to dealing with corporates who just agree to everything because they've got lots and lots of money...

Fifth:  Understand their chain of command...

Because of a certainty, there's a point where you'll have to go climbing that chain, best to know where the handholds are before you set foot on the cliff.  Deal with the people you start with, but when it's apparent that they don't have the answers, never worry about going one level higher, and if the person at the top doesn't have the answers, never worry about going somewhere else...

There are many other things of course, but get the basics first and the rest of it starts to fall into place...

2 comments:

  1. John, any word on when exhibitor bookings will start being taken?

    ReplyDelete