Wednesday, 22 July 2015

Pengineering - a new idea...

And so today I have added another skill to my bow, and in this particular case, I’m really pleased with the results...



Today I have taken my first steps into the world of Pengineering...

New word?

I suspect so, certainly the internet has nothing on it, only companies with the name, so I’m claiming it for the purposes of this post and perhaps a few more...

Pengineering is a combination of Pens and Engineering, because I’ve been looking for a number of years for a very specific combination of things in the pens I use, and through all my various travels, I’ve not been able to find that specific combination...

Requirements of the pen that I was looking for were as follows...

Must be able to use fountain pen inks, which have all the different colours I like to use.

Must have a nib that writes with a very fine line, 0.2 mm, 0.3mm at maximum.

The body of the pen must have some heft to it, ideally a metal body, I don’t like lightweight pens, I get nervous I’m going to break them...

The nib must sit away from the grip point, I don’t like coming away with more ink on my fingers than I have on my paper.



And in all the pens I’ve looked at, all the different combinations, I’ve never managed to find something that fit all those different profiles, until now.  These are the combination parts of the two pens I’ve been working with this morning.  The clear plastic pieces are from a Pilot Penmanship pen that got broken a short while ago (hence my dislike of fragile pens), the metal parts are from a Pilot MR pen, which has a good weight, good grip, and solid construction, but only comes in medium nibs, which are of no interest to me.

And so, checking up on various forums, it becomes clear that pilot nibs are interchangeable, all you’ve got to do is pull them real hard and they come out...

Needless to say, for a man who’s revered pens all his life, the idea of pulling them apart filled me with trepidation. If it worked, it could be excellent, if it failed, I’d have destroyed two good pens. Upon pulling them apart, I found that the nibs do come out very easily, swapping them over is simple, and the nibs are all designed to be interchangeable.

I should have taken up Pengineering years ago...

Now I have a pen solid in weight and narrow of nib, the ink is that of a fountain pen (even if I have to refill the cartridge using a syringe, and the writing...

Well...



It speaks for itself...


My first venture into the world of Pengineering, it will not be the last, does anyone else do this?

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